The tower said to the sun
See anyone coming?
The sun said Yes,
the past again coming tomorrow
issued with a clean gun
and the raw appearance of an oyster.
Mary Ruefle, from “Rumours of Earth,” Crazyhorse (Spring 2011)
And swift, and swift beyond conceiving,
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust, translated by Bayard Taylor (via talesofpassingtime)
Human beings are so destructive. I sometimes think we’re a kind of plague, that will scrub the earth clean. We destroy things so well that I sometimes think, maybe that’s our function. Maybe every few eons, some animal comes along that kills off the rest of the world, clears the decks, and lets evolution proceed to its next phase.
Michael Crichton
(via nativefunkk)
Light will someday split you open
Hafiz (via saalik)
zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission 
"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

zerostatereflex:

Jupiter’s Synchrotron Emission

"Movie made from observations of Jupiter by the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array. Jupiter’s spin axis is offset from its magnetic poles - meaning Jupiter has a "true north" and "magnetic north" like our planet does."

travelthisworld:

Ternate, Indonesia 
Sunset
submitted by: tsani, thanks!

travelthisworld:

Ternate, Indonesia

Sunset

submitted by: tsani, thanks!

thepaintedbench:

Cat on Constantine’s Foot, Palatine Museum, Rome

thepaintedbench:

Cat on Constantine’s Foot, Palatine Museum, Rome

Kipnis argues that we tend to blame each other or ourselves for the failures of the social structures we inhabit, rather than critiquing the structures (like marriage) themselves. Indeed so committed are we to these cumbersome structures and so lazy are we about coming up with alternatives to them that we bolster our sense of the rightness of heteronormative coupledom by drawing on animal narratives in order to place ourselves back in some primal and “natural” world.
The Queer Art of Failure by Judith Halberstam (via socio-logic)

Bad Religion - Faith Alone (1990)

pearl-nautilus:

“I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things, so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skillful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.” 
― Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet

pearl-nautilus:

“I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things, so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skillful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.” 

― Arthur Conan Doyle, A Study in Scarlet

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